Reviews

Milgrom’s engrossing study of taxidermy is both a general history ... and an introduction to figures in its contemporary subculture. Read entire review

—The New Yorker

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... a fascinating romp ... including an all-star cast of characters. Read entire review

—USA Today

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Taxidermy evokes hunting cabins and mounted white-tail deer, pheasants in flight and lacquered largemouth bass ... but in Still Life, Melissa Milgrom proves that the truth is far more complicated and more interesting ... Milgrom has pulled back the curtain on a surprising and intense culture ... Read entire review

—The New York Times Book Review

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This engrossing, affectionate study of an antiquated skill is both a general history and an introduction to the hobbyists and experts in its contemporary subculture.

—The New York Times Book Review, Paperback Row

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Conveying a controversial and plainly creepy subject like taxidermy is not an easy task, but in Milgrom’s book the disparate players on the scene—the naturalists, artists, and hunters—converge to illustrate a process that’s as exactingly scientific and time-honed as it is wondrous. Read entire review

—The New Yorker, The Book Bench

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... a literate, fascinating history.

—People

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... a delightful debut ... Milgrom has in Still Life opened up a whole world to readers. Read entire review

—Chicago Tribune,  Steve Fiffer, Author of Tyrannosaurus Sue: The Extraordinary Saga of the Largest, Most Fought Over T. Rex Ever Found

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Even in the age of Lolcats and Sugar Bush Squirrel, taxidermy, the subject of Melissa Milgrom’s riveting new book, Still Life: Adventures in Taxidermy, remains an esoteric and divisive field. But Milgrom proves there’s little reason for the latter. Read Q+A at salon.com

—Salon

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In Still Life, Melissa Milgrom’s page-turner, she ventures into the zany field of taxidermy, whose acolytes’ obsessive fastidiousness and determination fuel a common desire to preserve the dead as if they were alive. Read entire review

—Audubon, May-June 2011

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In this absorbing blend of bright-eyed reportage and hands-on participation, journalist Milgrom demystifies the creepy art of bringing dead creatures back to life and dispels the myth that taxidermists merely “stuff animals.” ... Though her own squeamish attempts to preserve a squirrel are less than stellar, Milgrom’s initial uneasy curiosity blossoms into genuine appreciation for a true art form, an enthusiasm the author imparts with style in this substantial study. Read entire review

—Publishers Weekly, starred review

READ Q+A WITH PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

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Brimming with respect and immersive vitality. Read entire review

—Kirkus Reviews

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Who knew a book about dead animals could be so lively? This is a wonderful look at a quirky, passionate, sometimes fanatical subculture.

—A.J. Jacobs, Author of The Know-It-All and The Guinea Pig Diaries

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... Milgrom’s lively account will appeal to readers who enjoyed Mary Roach’s quirky science books (Stiff; Spook; Bonk). Read entire review

—Library Journal

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An intriguing and eye-opening book.

—Booklist

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A delightful, illuminating journey through a passionate subculture that prizes the natural world (even if nature’s inhabitants are dead when taxidermists work their magic on them). Read entire review

—Shelf Awareness

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I’ve always believed that taxidermy is an underappreciated art, and one of Milgrom’s aims is to reveal the interesting ways in which it intersects with the history of natural science, and collecting. View blog entry

—Reagan Arthur Books Blog


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